Is France Dangerous for Jews?
Oct
30
7:30 PM19:30

Is France Dangerous for Jews?

JEWISH ENRICHMENT

With Marc Weitzmann
Journalist and Author

Before the attacks on Charlie Hebdo, the Bataclan night club, and others made international headlines, Marc Weitzmann observed a surge of seemingly random acts of violence against the Jews of France. He has investigated both the small-scale and large-scale acts of violence, and their roots in two very specific forms of populism, to show how the rebirth of French anti-Semitism relates to the new global terror wave, revealing France to be a localized laboratory for a global phenomenon.

Award-winning journalist Marc Weitzmann will recount the history and present day crisis of anti- Semitism in France and its dire message for the rest of the world.

This program is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


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Marc Weitzmann is an award-winning journalist who has published ten books in France. He was chief editor of the literary section of Les Inrockuptibles magazine in France for ten years (1995-2005), and is a regular contributor to Le Monde, Liberation, and Tablet Magazine.

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Justice for All? Ethics from Our Bible (Arlington, Virginia)
Nov
5
7:30 PM19:30

Justice for All? Ethics from Our Bible (Arlington, Virginia)

Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

With Jeremiah Unterman
Resident Scholar, Herzl Institute, Jerusalem, Israel
Academic Adviser for
The Koren Tanakh of the Land of Israel

The Hebrew Bible radically changed the course of ethical thought and came to exercise enormous influence on Jewish thought and law while also providing the basis for Christian ethics and the broader development of ethical thought in modern Western civilization.

Join us as Jeremiah Unterman discusses how the ethics of the Hebrew Bible represent a significant moral advance over Ancient Near East cultures. He will elucidate how the Bible’s unique conception of ethical monotheism, innovative understanding of covenantal law, and revolutionary messages from the prophets form the foundation of many Western civilization ideals. Discover how these timeless biblical texts connect to the persistent themes of our times: immigration policy, care for the less privileged, and attaining hope for the future despite destruction and exile.

This program is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


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Jeremiah Unterman, a Resident Scholar at the Herzl Institute, has been a Professor of Bible at Yeshiva University and elsewhere, and was Director of the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools in North America. He is the author of "Justice for All: How the Jewish Bible Revolutionized Ethics," published in 2017 by the Jewish Publication Society.

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Justice for All? Ethics from Our Bible (Potomac, Maryland)
Nov
6
7:30 PM19:30

Justice for All? Ethics from Our Bible (Potomac, Maryland)

Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

With Jeremiah Unterman
Resident Scholar, Herzl Institute, Jerusalem

The Hebrew Bible radically changed the course of ethical thought and came to exercise enormous influence on Jewish thought and law while also providing the basis for Christian ethics and the broader development of ethical thought in modern Western civilization.

Join us as Jeremiah Unterman discusses how the ethics of the Hebrew Bible represent a significant moral advance over Ancient Near East cultures. He will elucidate how the Bible’s unique conception of ethical monotheism, innovative understanding of covenantal law, and revolutionary messages from the prophets form the foundation of many Western civilization ideals. Discover how these timeless biblical texts connect to the persistent themes of our times: immigration policy, care for the less privileged, and attaining hope for the future despite destruction and exile.

This program is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


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Jeremiah Unterman, a Resident Scholar at the Herzl Institute, has been a Professor of Bible at Yeshiva University and elsewhere, and was Director of the Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools in North America. He is the author of "Justice for All: How the Jewish Bible Revolutionized Ethics," published in 2017 by the Jewish Publication Society.

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"Notorious RBG" and the Supreme Court's Jewish Justices
Nov
11
7:30 AM07:30

"Notorious RBG" and the Supreme Court's Jewish Justices

  • The National Museum of American Jewish History (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Join us for a day trip to the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. In addition to its regular collection, we will enjoy a private tour of the new "Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg" exhibition.

From Brandeis to Kagan, there have been eight Jewish Supreme Court Justices - so far. On the ride to Philadelphia, local scholar and attorney, David Epstein, will share the stories and influences of all eight Jewish justices. Additionally, those who chose will have the opportunity to visit the National Constitution Center during our time in Philadelphia.


$90 Friends of the Institute
$110 General Public

Registration closes on November 4. Spaces are limited.

Registration includes morning coffee, museum ticket, a private tour of the “Notorious RBG” exhibit, a kosher lunch, the charter bus, and driver’s gratuity.

The bus will depart from and return to Ohr Kodesh Congregation. We will meet at 7:30 AM and return around 6:30 PM. The return time may change due to weather and road conditions.


BECOME A FRIEND OF THE INSTITUTE AND SAVE!

Year-round benefits vary by the program and include discounted rates on programs that have registration fees, such as our Days of Learning, Learning on Wheels, many classes, and cultural events. Friends renew their status every summer to receive benefits throughout the academic year.

The rates for 2019-20 are $100 per individual or $120 per couple.

Click here to become a Friend or renew your Friendship status today.







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Israeli Social Transformation: What's Next?
Nov
19
7:30 PM19:30

Israeli Social Transformation: What's Next?

  • American University, Center for Israel Studies (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Haberman Distinguished Scholar Series

with Professor Calvin Goldscheider
Brown University Professor Emeritus, Scholar-in-Residence, American University

Interviewed by Dr. Lauren B. Strauss
American University, Jewish Studies Program, Affiliated faculty, Center for Israel Studies

Dr. Calvin Goldscheider, one of the world’s leading demographers and sociologists focusing on Israeli society, will reflect on subjects he explores in his acclaimed 2015 book Israeli Society in the Twenty-first Century: Immigration, Inequality, and Religious Conflict. From the socioeconomic inequalities affecting both the expanding ultra-Orthodox population and the Israeli Arab community (which now comprises over 21% of the nation’s citizens), to the massive impact of Soviet Jewish immigration, to the growth of its high-tech sector, Israel exemplifies the challenges of maintaining a pluralistic society in a region fraught with political and cultural tensions. 

Dr. Strauss, a professor of modern Jewish history and literature, will engage Dr. Goldscheider in a wide-ranging conversation about how his findings illuminate many of Israel’s current issues. Going deeper than the usual political prescriptions, the discussion will demonstrate that such research-based analysis can help us to more fully understand – and hopefully ameliorate – some of the most profound challenges faced by the Jewish State.

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Co-sponsored by the Center for Israel Studies, American University


This program is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


This program will take place in Butler Board room on the 6th floor of American University’s Butler Pavilion.   A campus map may be found here.

There is free parking after 5:00 PM in the Bender Sports Center garage adjacent to Butler Pavilion. 
If you park on level 6, enter doors marked towards Mary Graydon Center. The Butler Board Room is straight ahead when you enter from the garage.  If you park on levels 3-5, enter doors marked towards Mary Graydon and take elevator to floor 6.


Dr. Calvin Goldscheider

Dr. Calvin Goldscheider

Calvin Goldscheider’s major research publications have focused on the sociology and demography of ethnic populations, historically and comparatively, with a particular emphasis on family and immigration. He has published extensively in these fields in the leading sociology and demography journals and has edited eight collections of original scholarly research in demography. His major authored and co-authored books include: Population, Modernization and Social Structure; The Population of Israel; The Ethnic Factor in Family Structure and Mobility; The Transformation of the Jews; Jewish Continuity and Change; Leaving Home Before Marriage: Ethnicity, Family and Generational Relations; Israel's Changing Society: Population Ethnicity and Development; and The Transition to Adulthood. His most recent book is Cultures in Conflict The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Dr. Lauren B. Strauss

Dr. Lauren B. Strauss

Dr. Lauren B. Strauss is a professor of modern Jewish history, specializing in American Jewish cultural and political history. She has taught for twenty years at universities in the Washington, D.C. area. She holds a Ph.D. in Modern Jewish Studies from the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York, a Master’s degree in International Relations from Yale University, and a B.A. from Brandeis University. Dr. Strauss teaches courses on American Jewish politics, popular culture, and women’s history, and on Yiddish culture, post-Emancipation Jewish history, and modern Jewish travel. She is a frequent community lecturer and has taught many adult education classes in the D.C. area.

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Strangers in Strange Places: Jewish Refugees from Central Europe in the Late 1930's
Dec
11
7:30 PM19:30

Strangers in Strange Places: Jewish Refugees from Central Europe in the Late 1930's

  • Kehilat Pardes (located in the Berman Hebrew Academy) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

HABERMAN DISTINGUISHED SCHOLAR SERIES

with Marsha L. Rozenblit
Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor Jewish History, University of Maryland

Noted historian Dr. Marsha Rozenblit will share her insights into the plight of Jews fleeing Nazi Germany and Austria in the late 1930's who sought visas to any country that would accept them. While most hoped to go to the United States, Great Britain, or Palestine, many ended up in places that were indeed strange for people who had lived in Central Europe. In such havens as Bolivia or Shanghai, they sought to make new lives for themselves while coping with difficult climates, cultures that were profoundly foreign to them, and deep longing for home. Mostly, they recreated a German-speaking, Central European Jewish culture. While grateful that they had found a refuge from Nazism, they never integrated into the societies in which they lived. Dr. Rozenblit will explore how these immigrants coped and why they did not integrate into their new communities of refuge.

This program is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


Dr. Marsha Rozenblit

Dr. Marsha Rozenblit

Marsha L. Rozenblit is the Harvey M. Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History at the University of Maryland, where she has been on the faculty for 41 years. A social historian of the Jews of Central Europe, she is the author of two books: The Jews of Vienna, 1867-1914: Assimilation and Identity (1983) and Reconstructing a National Identity: The Jews of Habsburg Austria during World War I (2001). She has also co-edited two books: Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe (2005) and World War I and the Jews: Conflict and Transformation in Europe, the Middle East, and America (2017); and she has written over 30 scholarly articles on such topics as the failure to establish Reform Judaism in Nineteenth Century Vienna, German-Jewish Schools in Habsburg Moravia, and Jewish marriage and courtship in 1920s Vienna.

She has also served as the director of the Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies at the University of Maryland (1998-2003) and as president of the Association for Jewish Studies (2009-2011)

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Tango Under Jewish Stars
Dec
15
4:00 PM16:00

Tango Under Jewish Stars

  • Adat Shalom Reconstructionist Congregation (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

JEWISH ENRICHMENT CONCERT
Warm Songs for Cold Nights

Hazzan Dr. Ramón Tasat (and guest artists)
Hazzan, Congregation Shirat HaNefesh,
Musical Director Kolot HaLev Community Choir

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Did you know that the Argentine tango evolved out of the immigrant culture of late 19th Century? It began in Buenos Aires and spread throughout the “Río de la Plata,” the geographic area that connects Argentina and Uruguay. Immigrants from Italy, Spain, Russia, Poland and Germany (including individuals from Jewish origin) flooded the country and they brought with them their musical influences, fusing them together into this new, exciting genre.

Beginning in the 20th Century, the tango became increasingly more popular throughout the world. Jews embraced the genre as well, composing beautiful renditions in Yiddish, Russian, Ladino and Hebrew. Join us for a musical travelogue of this enchanting dance of life.

$20 In Advance, Friends of the Haberman Institute and Adat Shalom members
$30 In Advance, General Public
$35 At the Door, All


BECOME A FRIEND OF THE INSTITUTE AND SAVE!

Year-round benefits vary by the program and include discounted rates on programs that have registration fees, such as our Days of Learning, Learning on Wheels, many classes, and cultural events. Friends renew their status every summer to receive benefits throughout the academic year.

The rates for 2019-20 are $100 per individual or $120 per couple.

Click here to become a Friend or renew your Friendship status today.


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Seasons & Reasons: Hanukkah
Dec
18
7:30 PM19:30

Seasons & Reasons: Hanukkah

  • Bender JCC of Greater Washington (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

JEWISH ENRICHMENT

With Rabbi Jack Luxenburg
Rabbi Emeritus, Temple Beth Ami, Rockville MD

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Casting Light Into Darkness: Hanukkah as a Jewish Response to Trying Times

Hanukkah is a powerful expression of Jewish values at times of difficulty and darkness.This is true whether in terms of the season, critical moments in Jewish history, or during trying times in our personal lives. It is also a popular holiday linked to a complicated narrative rife with unforeseen consequences. Who were the Maccabees and what did they stand for? What did they accomplish? How do Jewish sources respond to them? Why did our sages keep the Book of Maccabees out of the Bible? Learn how the Maccabees, their story, and “The Festival of Lights” can be relevant and meaningful to us today beyond the simple joys of candle lighting, latkes, “gelt” and gift giving.

This is not a “how to celebrate” class; rather, it frames rituals as responses to the human condition, which we benefit from by revisiting each year.

This class is free and open to the public, however a limited number of spaces are available. You must register to reserve your spot.


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Rabbi Jack Luxemburg, Rabbi Emeritus retired after 35 years as Temple Beth Ami’s Senior Rabbi, in July 2016. Beginning in July of 1981 as the congregation’s first full-time Rabbi, Rabbi Luxemburg has been part of the Temple Beth Ami community for more than half of its history.

The American Jewish Congress and the State of Israel have honored Rabbi Luxemburg for his service to the organization. He has also been honored by the local UJA/Federation and the Council of Jewish Federations in recognition of his leadership in the Jewish community. He is a founding member of ARZA, the Association of Reform Zionists in America. He remains active in local civic affairs as an instructor on Family Life Education for Montgomery County teachers, a member of the county’s Civil Rights Monitoring Group, and an advisor to local legislators. Rabbi Luxemburg is profiled in “Who’s Who in the East” and “Who’s Who in Religion.”

Rabbi Luxemburg is the only area Rabbi to have completed a study grant from the March of Dimes to train at Georgetown University Hospital in the field of Human Genetics and counseling human genetics problems. He received his Doctoral degree in Pastoral Theology from the Wesley Theological Seminary, Washington, D.C., culminating four years of academic study and clinical training. 

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Seasons & Reasons: Fall Holidays
Sep
17
7:30 PM19:30

Seasons & Reasons: Fall Holidays

JEWISH ENRICHMENT

With Avi West
Senior Education Officer, Jewish Federation of Greater Washington; Master Teacher

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In this fall session, we will explore the universal themes of creation/stewardship, redemption and forgiveness, gratitude, and what's really important in life. We will then see how the particular rituals and texts associated with the Jewish fall holidays, (Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot and Shemini Atzeret), provide perspectives - some 3,500 years in the making - for wrestling with these themes.

This is not a “how to celebrate” class; rather, it frames rituals as responses to the human condition, which we benefit from by revisiting each year.

This class is free and open to the public, however a limited number of spaces are available. You must register to reserve your spot.


Avi West

Avi West

Avi West is Federation’s Senior Education Officer and Master Teacher. Avi integrates accessible and inclusive Judaic content into instructional and identity-building experiences for learners of all ages. As a specialist, he is the coordinator of ROUTES, Federation’s annual community-wide day of adult study, and works to make a more robust framework for adult Jewish learning in Greater Washington. Avi consults with educational leadership and offers professional development workshops for educators and Jewish life presentations for parents. Among his teachers and influencers are his 6 grandchildren in Israel and Gaithersburg.

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Jews & Genetics: Looking at Our History Through Our Heredity
Sep
11
7:30 PM19:30

Jews & Genetics: Looking at Our History Through Our Heredity

  • Washington Hebrew Congregation (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Jewish Enrichment

With Nadine Epstein
Editor-in-Chief, Moment Magazine

Nadine Epstein shares her efforts to discover her family that had vanished over many generations. She utilized genealogical sleuthing, DNA and genetic testing, as well as “cousin-fishing” to reassemble her family tree. Her adventures took her to shtetls and cities in Eastern Europe and introduced her to an online universe of fellow travelers and close relatives, finally curing what she calls her chronic “familial loneliness syndrome.” Epstein has been writing about Jewish genealogy since the 1990’s.

This program is joyously sponsored by Andrew Ammerman in loving memory of Jodie and Max Ammerman and Stephen C. Ammerman.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested.


Nadine Epstein

Nadine Epstein

Nadine Epstein is the Editor-in-Chief and CEO of Moment Magazine, founder and executive director of the Center for Creative Change, and founder of the Daniel Pearl Investigative Journalism Initiative. She covered politics in the Chicago bureau of the New York Times and at the City News Bureau of Chicago. She was a Knight-Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan, holds a B.A. and M.A. in International Relations from the University of Pennsylvania, and was a University Fellow in the political science doctoral program at Columbia University. Epstein has written several books, contributed to anthology collections and co-written a documentary film that was a semifinalist for the 2001 Academy Awards. She is also a photographer and is based in Washington DC.

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Jewish Communities and the Aftermath of Crises
Sep
10
7:30 PM19:30

Jewish Communities and the Aftermath of Crises

  • Leisure World, The Chesapeake Room, Clubhouse #1 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Jewish Enrichment

with Rabbi Seth Bernstein
Disaster Special Care Lead, American Red Cross, Greater Chesapeake Region

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More and more often, Jewish communities are experiencing crises that were unthinkable twenty years ago (e.g. Chabad of Poway, Tree of Life in Pittsburgh). While most of these tragedies make the news, what happens to these communities once the crisis has abated is often left uncovered.

Seth Bernstein, a venerated rabbi and an experienced chaplain, is often called upon to help communities and families after such tragic events. His experiences from the World Trade Center destruction in 2001 to the shooting in Pittsburgh last year have caused him to recognize patterns that follow from these incidents. Such occurrences often leave the communities in disarray in their aftermath. Rabbi Bernstein will share his unique, behind-the-scenes perspective on the real needs of Jewish communities confronting such challenges.

This program is free and open to the public.
Advance registration is requested as spaces are limited.


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Rabbi Seth L. Bernstein was most recently the spiritual leader of Bet Aviv in Columbia, MD. He is a Board Certified chaplain and the Disaster Spiritual Care lead of the Greater Chesapeake Region of the American Red Cross. His most recent deployment was in October 2018 when he was one of three American Red Cross disaster spiritual care team members to respond immediately in the first week following the shootings in the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, PA.

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New Finds in an Ancient Land
Sep
2
9:30 AM09:30

New Finds in an Ancient Land

Day of Learning | Labor Day 2019

With Dr. Jodi Magness
Kenan Distinguished Professor for Teaching Excellence in Early Judaism, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Acclaimed archaeologist Dr. Jodi Magness reveals her newest discoveries about the history and legend of Masada. She will take us on an archaeological journey which will include an examination of the Dead Sea Scrolls and the ancient synagogue at Huqoq.

Sessions will include:

Masada: The Last Stronghold of the Jewish Resistance Against Rome
In the first century B.C.E., Herod the Great, who ruled Judea as client king on behalf of Rome, built a fortified palace atop the mountain of Masada overlooking the Dead Sea. Seventy years after Herod's death, the First Jewish Revolt against Rome broke out and Jewish rebels occupied Masada. According to the ancient historian Flavius Josephus, at the end of the revolt the Romans besieged the mountain and the Jewish rebels committed mass suicide. We will survey the history and archaeology of Masada, including the results of excavations in the Roman siege works which Professor Magness co-directed in 1995.

The Archaeology of Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls
In 1946-1947, the first Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered by accident near the site of Qumran. Eventually the remains of approximately 1000 scrolls were found in 11 caves surrounding Qumran. In this slide-illustrated lecture, we will explore the archaeological remains of Qumran, which was inhabited by members of a Jewish sect who deposited the scrolls in the nearby caves, and examine the meaning and significance of the scrolls.

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More Than Just Mosaics: The Ancient Synagogue at Huquq in Israel’s Galilee
Since 2011, Professor Magness has been directing excavations in the ancient village of Huqoq in Israel's Galilee. The excavations have brought to light the remains of a monumental Late Roman (fifth century) synagogue building paved with stunning and unique mosaics, including biblical scenes and the first non-biblical story ever discovered decorating an ancient synagogue. In this third slide-illustrated lecture, Professor Magness will describe these exciting finds, including the discoveries made in last summer's season.


ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED.
REGISTRATION WILL RE-OPEN AT THE DOOR MONDAY AT 9:30 AM.

Register by Thursday, August 29 at noon for advance rates.
$65 In Advance, Friends of the Haberman Institute
$75 In Advance, General Public
$90 At the Door, All

Registration includes morning coffee and “nosh,” and a kosher lunch.
Doors will open at 9:30 AM for check in, registration and time to enjoy a morning snack. The first lecture will begin promptly at 10:00 AM.


eBecome a Friend of the Institute and Save!

Year-round benefits vary by the program and include discounted rates on programs that have registration fees, such as our Days of Learning, Learning on Wheels, many classes, and cultural events. Friends renew their status every summer to receive benefits throughout the academic year.

The rates for 2019-20 are $100 per individual or $120 per couple.

Click here to become a Friend or renew your Friendship status today.


Dr. Jodi Magness

Dr. Jodi Magness

Dr. Magness is the current President of the Archaeological Institute of America, and has published 10 books, including The Archaeology of the Holy Land, and dozens of articles.

Specializing in the archaeology of ancient Palestine (modern Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian territories) in the Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods, her research interests include Jerusalem, Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient synagogues, Masada, the Roman army in the East, and ancient pottery - many of which she will share with our community this Labor Day!

Dr. Jodi Magness comes to the Haberman Institute through the Association for Jewish Studies Distinguished Lectureship Program.

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